Psychiatric Abuse & Malpractice

While many “standard” psychiatric procedures could be considered to be of dubious benefit to patients, there are certain types of psychiatric abuse that are frowned upon by the profession itself as well as by the law – some of these are actionable by health departments and professional psychiatric boards and some are additionally punishable under criminal law.

Below are examples of conduct and procedures that either constitute or may constitute or be an indicator of an actionable violation of psychiatric professional ethics, or of the law of your country or state.

This is not an exhaustive list. Anyone whose mother, wife, sister or father, brother, son, child or friend has been killed or damaged by psychiatric “treatment”, please write full particulars and any documentary evidence here. All names and confidences will be fully protected.

If you are unsure if your child or someone you know have experienced abuse by a psychiatrist or other mental health practitioner, please call us at 1-800-998-0399. We will assist you however we can, which may include helping you to document the abuse so that you may file a complaint with the proper authority and/or providing information about alternatives to psychiatric treatment.

Anyone whose mother, wife, sister or father, brother, son, child or friend has been killed or damaged by psychiatric “treatment”, please write full particulars and any documentary evidence to CCHR Orange County. All names and confidences will be fully protected.

When an instance of abuse has occurred, it is important to report it and set the facts straight. This will help ensure that it doesn’t happen to others and can help bring about justice for the person that has been harmed.

Report psychiatric abuse!

We will to talk to anyone who has questions, has experienced psychiatric abuse or might be in search of alternatives to psychiatric treatment. We will assist you however we can, which may include helping you to document the abuse so that you can file a complaint with the proper authority and/or providing information resources about alternatives to psychiatric treatment.

Call our Psychiatric Abuse Hotline now at 1-800-998-0399

Or click here to send us a message online

 

Actionable psychiatric abuse may include:

Billing fraud and unlawful procedures:

– Fraudulent billing (example: insurance company was defrauded by a psychiatrist as in the person is charged for consultations or treatment they never received or were not in the city during the time for which the psychiatrist has charged them)

– Double billings

– Outrageous charges on the patient’s insurance bills

– The doctor’s secretary wrote the patient’s prescription instead of the doctor himself

Coercive psychiatric drugging and treatment of children:

– Threatening a parent with suspending the child from school or not allowing the child back in school unless the child is put on medications such as for ADD or ADHD

– Threats of the child being taken away from the parent by Child Services if the parent doesn’t put their child on medications or allows their child to be given other types of psychiatric treatment

Abuse by private practitioners:

– Unprofessional conduct by a psychiatrist or psychiatric personnel (this could include psychiatric personnel trying to date a patient, asking a patient to set up a date for them with a friend of the patient, or any other conduct that could be regarded as unprofessional within a doctor-patient relationship)

– Diagnosis without actually examining the patient or without examining the patient sufficiently

– Excessive drugging or negligent treatment with drugs (such as prescribing drugs without checking for drug allergies or prescribing drugs incompatible with the patient’s current medical conditions)

– Drugging without the patient’s permission, or without fully informing the patient of possible side effects and alternatives

– Intolerable, permanent or persisting side-effects from drugs

– Threatening the patient with punishment or commitment to a psychiatric institution if the patient refuses to accept psychiatric treatment

– Coercing a patient into hospitalization or treatment, or giving treatment without informed consent or knowledge of alternatives
– Physical assault

– Sexual assault or misconduct (note that this could happen unbeknownst to the patient due to drugging, or could also be done openly and disguised as “therapy”)

– Administration of Electroshock Treatment, Lobotomy or Insulin Shock Treatment without consent or without fully informing the patient of its effects

– Wrongful death (a person died at the hands of a psychiatrist from psychiatric drugs, suicide, etc.)

Abuse specific to psychiatric hospitals and institutions:

– Involuntary admission to a psychiatric institution

– Not informing the patient of his/her rights as a patient before or at any time during admission to a psychiatric facility, informing the patient of them incorrectly, incompletely or under inappropriate circumstances

– Refusing the patient the use of a phone or writing materials

– Unprofessional conduct by the staff or psychiatrist (this could include psychiatric personnel trying to date a patient, asking a patient to set up a date for them with a friend, or any other conduct that could be regarded as unprofessional)

– Diagnosis without actually examining the patient or without examining the patient sufficiently

– Keeping poor records of the patient’s treatment

– Placing the patient in isolation

– Denying the patient conventional medical examination and medical care

– Use of physical restraints

– Threatening the patient with physical harm

– Threatening the patient with punishment if the patient refuses to accept psychiatric treatment

– Physical assault

– Sexual assault or misconduct (note that this could happen unbeknownst to the patient due to prior drugging, or could also be done openly and disguised as “therapy”)

– Administration of Electroshock Treatment without consent or without fully informing the patients of its effects

– Wrongful death (a person died at the hands of a psychiatrist from psychiatric drugs, suicide, etc.)

Signs of psychiatric abuse and/or malpractice

It can be difficult to identify psychiatric abuse, mostly because no one knows what goes on behind the closed doors of a treatment room except the medical professional and his or her patients. People with serious mental conditions – especially those that involve dementia – are rarely considered credible when they make complaints. This is why it is important to watch out for any signs of abuse, and why any indication of psychiatric abuse should be investigated thoroughly.

Below are some possible indicators that abuse may has occurred at the hands of a psychiatrist or other mental health practitioner.

A loved one can give his or her psychiatrist permission to answer your questions, which waives doctor-patient confidentiality.

Strange Reactions to Drugs

One method of psychiatric abuse is the administration of medication that is either harmful, experimental or of incorrect dosage. Prescribing the wrong medication to a psychiatric patient can be lethal at worst, but will always cause some type of problem, often in the form of a strange reaction. If you or someone you love is suffering hives, nausea, pain, discomfort or any symptom not described on the packaging, contact another health care professional immediately for a consultation.

Discomfort or Shame After Sessions

This is a way that you can identify psychiatric abuse of someone else, such as a loved one. If the patient returns from sessions with their psychiatrist and seems uncomfortable or ashamed, there may be a problem that you don’t know about. Attempting to draw out the patient’s fears or concerns can be detrimental, so seek the counsel of another mental health professional. Sometimes a second opinion will uncover psychiatric abuse that otherwise would have gone unnoticed.

Strange Marks or Bruises

Some alternative therapies that have come up in various lawsuits and ethics debates cause physical harm to patients. If a loved one comes home from sessions with bruises, cuts or strange marks on his or her body, it could be a symptom of psychiatric abuse.No physical damage should ever be done to a patient as a result of therapy.

The above three examples are just a sampling of what can happen as a result of psychiatric abuse, and this happens every day. It is important to watch out for any signs of abuse.

 

A Note on Psychiatric Rape

Psychiatrists make up only six percent of all doctors, yet they account for thirty three percent of all the sexual crimes committed by doctors. In fact, the percentage of sexual molestation by psychiatrists is thirty-seven times greater than that of the general public. Psychiatrists themselves say that sixty five percent of their new patients tell them they have been sexually abused by their former psychiatrists. Eighty percent of psychiatrists who have sexual relations with their patients do so with more than one patient.

Current estimates are that 150,000 women have been sexually abused by their psychiatrists in the United States alone.1500 have committed suicide. Another 21,000 have tried to commit suicide. Another 16,000 ended up hospitalised because of the harm caused from this violation by their psychiatrist.

A 1994 study showed that women are three times more likely than men to be prescribed drugs for exactly the same symptoms. Currently there are twice as many female psychiatric patients as men and half of these women are on psychiatric drugs. In the United States 660,000 people receive electric shock therapy annually of which two thirds are women.

 

Call our Psychiatric Abuse Hotline now at 1-800-998-0399

Or click here to send us a message online